Tuesday, October 09, 2012

Mirror Synchronicity: Let's Talk about Death

Tonight on ABC World News, Diane Sawyer introduced The Conversation Project, an initiative to get families talking about end-of-life choices.  A family was chosen for the story to have the discussion in front of the cameras.  In the interviews, and in the subsequent article, the father can be seen multiple times wearing clothes with an Ohio State logo.


Ohio State is located in Columbus, OH, which was the home of the first Death Cafe in the United States.  It appears Columbus folks are ready to have the conversation.



2 comments:

Brizdaz (Darren) said...

I just saw this article on the news and thought you and your readers may be interested -

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/world/8545600/doctor-sees-heaven-in-out-of-body-journey

"Doctor 'sees heaven' in out-of-body journey "

" A top neurosurgeon who dismissed patients' tales of afterlife experiences is now a convert after seeing a world of "big fluffy pink-white clouds" during his own near-death experience.

Eben Alexander spent 15 years teaching neurosurgery at Harvard Medical School in the US before he was struck by a near fatal bout of bacterial meningitis in November 2008.

The 58-year-old father-of-two fell into a coma for seven days, during which he says the part of the brain that controls human thought and emotion "shut down".

During that time Dr Alexander said he experienced "something so profound that it gave me reason to believe in consciousness after death".

Dr Alexander described himself as a "faithful Christian" before his near-death experience but said it was "more in name than actual belief".

In an essay published in US magazine Newseek to promote his book Proof of Heaven, Dr Alexander said he experienced a "place of clouds, big fluffy pink-white ones" and "shimmering beings".

Dr Alexander ponders whether the "beings" were angels, saying they were "different from anything I have known on this planet. They were more advanced. Higher forms".

The doctor said he previously regarded patients' out-of-body experiences as "wishful thinking" but he has now changed his mind.

"Had someone even a doctor told me a story like this in the old days, I would have been quite certain that they were under the spell of some delusion.

"But what happened to me was, far from being delusional, as real or more real than any event in my life. That includes my wedding day and the birth of my two sons."

Dr Alexander earned his medical degree from Duke University in the US in 1980 and has also taught at the University of Virginia, lecturing on brain mapping, the treatment of brain tumours and trying to understand cognition. "

Lien said...

It's amazing this post is about death but I just happen to work in a dental office and you spoke of dentistry in the paragraph.